Green Developments

Richard Hassell, WOHA

GREEN IT UP - Leaders in sustainable design tell us how buildings can bring wellbeing to people, even in high-density cities


Read on turning pages | Download PDF | sign up to CLAD

Stress, heat, pollutants, artificial light, sedentary lifestyles … it’s little wonder the planet’s city dwellers are seeking respite when they travel. Whether drawn to the prospect of reconnecting with nature or investing in time to enhance their sense of wellbeing, more people today are electing to holiday in destinations with a wellness offering. Just as Asia has proven a pioneer of the spa resort, so too has the region been leading a movement to reverse the decline in quality of our built environments. Populations may explode, metropolises may sprawl, high-rises may climb ever higher but perhaps our urban spaces need not be the natural enemy of wellbeing. That’s certainly the thinking behind the green strategies being developed by progressive design studios in Asia and America. They believe it’s possible to create a sense of wellbeing both for people and the planet through a commitment to sustainable building design in urban settings and beyond.

Holistic approach
“It’s been well documented that being connected to nature has positive psychological and physiological benefits,” says Richard Hassell, director of award-winning WOHA Architects.

“Greenery is wonderfully effective at combating the heat islands created by cities, while removing polluting volatile organic compounds such as benzene and formaldehyde from the air,” Hassell says. “So when we build an urban hotel or residence, we think of it from the outset as a resort in the middle of the city. We believe it’s essential to maintain the ratio between building density and space allocated to naturally calming environments. Indeed by working to a minimum ratio of 100 per cent, whereby the world is just as green as it was prior to our site being developed, we apply what we call our ‘do no harm’ quantum.”

Based in Singapore, WOHA set benchmarks over 10 years ago with its design for Newton Suites, a 36-storey residential development in which an area of landscaping equivalent to 130 per cent of the site was generated. The high-rise was partly responsible for Singapore’s planning authorities moving towards the 2009 implementation of its Landscaping for Urban Spaces and Highrises (LUSH) programme, applicable to private developments in the residential, hospitality, retail and office sectors. Covering designated ‘strategic areas’ of the city, one of the programme’s core stipulations is that private developers must replace greenery lost as a result of their project’s construction with landscaped areas equivalent, at least, to the development’s site area. This replacement greenery can be provided in the form of landscaping, roof gardens, sky terraces or planter boxes, and should incorporate communal facilities. Developers of existing mixed-used properties meanwhile are rewarded with bonus gross floor area for outdoor dining facilities if they make an application to convert their rooftops into a garden or green space.

Parkroyal on Pickering
Applying learning from the residential to the hospitality field, WOHA has since been responsible for one of the 12 hotels to be awarded Green Mark Platinum certification by Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority. Set within the bustling Central Business District, Parkroyal on Pickering opened in 2013 with 15,000sqm (double the site area) of sky gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls, planter terraces and green walls.

“You can’t achieve this level of integration without an operator who understands that there has to be a commitment to harmonised architecture, interior design and landscaping from the get-go,” points out Hassell. “When these responsibilities are allocated to separate firms, it’s all too easy for architecture to be driven into an enclosed box, especially when there are restrictions on height and floor space due to commercial considerations. It’s difficult to carve out an internal courtyard or plan for a sky garden, for example, once the architecture has been signed off.”

A shift in the mindset of hotel operators means that more are interested in the long-term advantages of green design, even if this means their spend on mechanical and technical systems is higher in the initial stages of their project. In return, WOHA recognises that its innovations need to be beautiful, practical and capable of showing quantifiable benefits.

With this in mind, Parkroyal on Pickering maximises natural daylight through its open-sided courtyard configuration while vertical greenery shields the hotel’s west-facing walls to keep them cool and prevent heat radiating into guest rooms. Corridors, lobbies and washrooms have been arranged with planting and water features to generate more natural light and fresh air, avoiding them turning into 24-hour energy-guzzling spaces. In fact, there is no air-conditioning installed in external corridors but with the combined shading from sky trees and overhanging plants as well as radiant heat absorbed by vertical greenery, the ambient temperature is always cooler than outside the building. Lush landscaped terraces and sky gardens, planted with species selected for their durability in the tropical climate, complete the scheme.

“Studies by the National University of Singapore have shown a temperature drop of 3.3?C behind green walls, which means that developers in tropical climates are less reliant on air-conditioning to keep their buildings cool,” says Hassell. “Alongside this resulting reduction in electricity bills, other benefits of a green scheme are the ability for areas such as landscaped gardens and rooftops to be hired out as event spaces, generating revenue in their own right.”

As an architecture and design practice that works closely with operating teams, WOHA is all too aware of the practical issues that can arise with vertical greenery.

“In the case of some green walls, we’ve seen owners forced to hire a maintenance gondola simply to replace a dead plant,” Hassell adds. “So we’ve divided the Parkroyal building into blocks with linkways and terraces to allow ease of access for a gardener and a wheelbarrow to attend to every section of planting. The selection of low-maintenance plants such as ferns and palms, coupled with an automatic irrigation system, minimises the needs for constant maintenance. Currently gardeners are scheduled to conduct checks and regular trimming twice a week across the property.”

As well as the hotel’s self-sustaining irrigation system, which collects rain to water the plants, rooftop solar panels power the grow lamps and softscape lighting installed throughout the landscaping.

New Cuffe Parade
This holistic approach to design is undoubtedly at home in a country known as the garden city-state but perhaps its application makes most sense in those cities under threat of losing their green spaces.

Mumbai, a case in point, is the site of a high-rise residential complex with Indian developer Lodha Group. New Cuffe Parade in the Wadala district comprises 10 64-storey residential towers and a commercial tower, clad in a shimmering aluminium screen that diffuses light and creates shade. Apartments overlook a 10-hectare recreational garden while the external façades are dressed in vertical green walls. It’s the first time a green high-rise of this ambition and scale has been attempted in Mumbai, says Hassell.

Meanwhile WOHA’s mission continues, now over in Phuket. Aiming for LEED certification from the US Green Building Council, Rosewood Phuket is being constructed according to passive design principles. Large overhangs are a characteristic of the building structures, cross-ventilated spaces are commonplace and all existing trees have been secured and incorporated into the design. Photovoltaic cells for energy collection, massive water-storage dams embedded into the landscaping, reverse osmosis water-filtration systems, grey water recycling and coral reef restoration are some of the additional features that will ensure this resort, due for completion in 2017, moves the green hospitality agenda forward.

Gallery
Click on an image to open the image gallery
company profile
Company profile: GOCO Hospitality
As a complete wellness consulting and management firm specialising in designing, developing and operating wellness-based projects, GOCO Hospitality o ers a turnkey solution for each phase of development.
Try cladmag for free!
Sign up with CLAD to receive our regular ezine, instant news alerts, free digital subscriptions to CLADweek, CLADmag and CLADbook and to request a free sample of the next issue of CLADmag.
sign up
features
Holl was a close friend of 
Zaha Hadid
Steven Holl is widely considered to be one of America’s most important and influential architects
" What sound is to music, light is to space "

The acclaimed architect speaks to CLAD about Donald Trump, Zaha Hadid and not being obedient

Alison Brooks
Alison Brooks
"The profession is changing"

We need to help the public understand that architects are on their side, argues The Smile designer

Gensler worked on the renovation of Capital One in Richmond, Virgina
Tom Lindblom
"Public spaces support the widest diversity of experiences"

At last concrete proof that design is the critical factor that turns good experiences into great ones says Gensler’s Tom Lindblom

Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
To advertise in our catalogue gallery: call +44(0)1462 431385
features
The building was designed to minimise energy loss
"Whenever you’re looking at it, the elevation is running away from you, so it never looks quite as big as it really is "

FaulknerBrowns’ Dutch sports facility

SimpsonHaugh 
worked with acoustician 
Larry Kirkegaard
"It’s a privilege to have completed a scheme of such importance to the cultural identity of Antwerp - Stuart Mills"

SimsponHaugh’s latest project

features
Rossana Hu studied at the University of California at Berkeley, where she met Lyndon Neri
"Interior projects carried out by architects have a depth that’s generally lacking today"

Neri & Hu’s latest project

The footprint of the building was defined by the triangular shape of the site, says MacEwen
DMAC’s Dwayne MacEwen
"The hotel concept came late in the game, but it was an inspired idea"

The newly renovated Chicago Midtown Athletic Club features a boutique hotel, a pool-come-ice rink and spaces designed by Venus Williams

The Yongsan Park project will see a military installation replaced by a public park
Adriaan Geuze
"The profile of landscape architecture has been raised by international cities competing with one another"

How the West 8 founder is using the healing power of nature on a Korean site with a turbulent history

cladkit product news
Parkside opens flagship Chelsea showroom
The showroom is designed to inspire its clients
Lauren Heath-Jones
Parkside, a designer of contemporary porcelain and ceramic tiles, has opened its first showroom in the UK. Located in Chelsea ...
Empex Watertoys partners with Singapore architecture firm on new splash park
Buds is a new splash park that caters to children aged 12 and under
Lauren Heath-Jones
Empex Watertoys has partnered with Singapore landscape architecture firm Playpoint Singapore Pte to create Buds, an exciting new splash park ...
Hotel Crescent Court opens new spa following multi-million-dollar renovation
Hotel Crescent Court has reopened its spa after a multi-million dollar refurbishment
Lauren Heath-Jones
Hotel Crescent Court, a luxury hotel in Dallas, Texas, has reopened its spa and fitness centre after completing a multi-million-dollar ...
cladkit product news
FAÇADE award winners 'diverse and remarkable', says SFE board member
Ramboll was awarded for the Blavatnik Building, Switchouse Extension of the Tate Moder
Lauren Heath-Jones
A trio of British leisure facilities have been honoured in the Façade2017 awards. Established in 2013 by the Society of ...
Kvorning wins contest to design aquaculture exhibit at Norway's Coastal Museum
The exhibition explores the history of Norway's fish-farming industry dating back to 1970
Lauren Heath-Jones
Copenhagen-based design studio Kvorning Design and Norwegian advertising agency Vindfang have won a competition, organised by Museums in Sør Trøndelag ...
Dornbracht debuts Rainmoon wellness shower concept at  Salone del Mobile
Rainmoon is a multi-sensory wellness experience designed to revitalise and reinvigorate the user
Lauren Heath-Jones
Dornbracht, a German-based luxury bathroom specialist, has launched an innovative new shower experience, Rainmoon. Slated as the next generation of ...
cladkit product news
Ben van Berkel launches UNSense startup to boost health and wellbeing in built environments
Kim Megson
Dutch architect Ben van Berkel and his design firm UNStudio have launched a tech startup to “improve the health and ...
London's new pollution-eating living wall has air purifying power of 275 trees
CityTree is a living wall that reduces particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide in the air by 30 per cent
Lauren Heath-Jones
The Crown Estate, a London-based commercial real estate company, has partnered with Westminster City Council and cleantech specialist Evergen Systems ...